On May 25th, 2010 we celebrated the 200th anniversary of the revolution that cleared the way for the Argentinean independence.

Bicentennial celebrations began on May 21st in Buenos Aires, with millions of people in attendance, making it the biggest outdoor party Argentina has seen since it celebrated its return to democratic rule after seven years of military dictatorship in 1983.

The 9 de Julio Avenue was closed to the traffic between Corrientes and Belgrano avenues during the festivity days, and was used to host the main celebrations.

A number of military parades of modern and historical regiments and units, including the Regiment of Patricians and the Regiment of Mounted Grenadiers. They were followed by parades representing the provinces of Argentina and their local cultures.

The capital’s famous Teatro Colon concert hall was reopened, after a four-year refurbishment project, for a special ceremony that included ballet and extracts from famous operas and was beamed via projectors onto walls outside.

Many artists sang new versions of patriotic hymns, there were a lot of exhibitions, lectures and courses.

Presidents Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (Brazil), Sebastián Piñera (Chile), José Mujica (Uruguay), Hugo Chávez (Venezuela), Rafael Correa (Ecuador), Fernando Lugo (Paraguay) and Evo Morales (Bolivia) and ex-presidents Manuel Zelaya (Honduras) and Martín Torrijos (Panama) arrived in Buenos Aires for the closing parade.

A little bit of History

The May Revolution (Revolución de Mayo) was a week-long series of revolutionary events that took place from May 18 to May 25, 1810, in Buenos Aires, capital of the Virreinato del Río de la Plata, a colony of the Spanish Empire which included the present-day nations of Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay. The consequences of these events were the ousting of Viceroy Baltasar Hidalgo de Cisneros and the establishment of a local government, La Primera Junta on May 25. These events are commemorated in Argentina as “Semana de Mayo” (May Week)

The May Revolution is considered the starting point of the Argentine War of Independence, although no formal declaration of independence was issued at the time, and the Primera Junta continued to govern in the name of the deposed king Ferdinand VII.
The formal Declaration of Independence took place at the Congress of Tucumán on July 9, 1816.

Verbum - School of Spanish - A 3d projection on the Cabildo, representing important moments in the Argentinean history.
A 3d projection on the Cabildo, representing important moments in the Argentinean history.

Verbum School of Spanish - Murga
Murga (popular dance)

Verbum - School of Spanish - The
The “Fuerza Bruta” crew

Spanish school in Buenos Aires - Madres de Plaza de Mayo
Actors enacting the Madres de Plaza de Mayo

Verbum - School of Spanish -  Actors enacting the return of the Democracy
Actors enacting the return of the Democracy

Verbum - School of Spanish - Actors enacting the Malvinas (Falklands) soldiers
Actors enacting the Malvinas (Falklands) soldiers

Verbum - School of Spanish - The national industry represented in fridges factories and
The national industry represented in fridges factories and “Siam” cars. This is a symbol of the substitution of imports.

Verbum - School of Spanish - Actors enacting different social movement of the beginnings of the 20th century.
Actors enacting different social movement of the beginnings of the 20th century.

Verbum - School of Spanish - The
The “gauchos” made an asado that was distributed to people in the crowd.

Verbum - School of Spanish - Nearly 2 million people assisted to the Bicentennial celebration.

Verbum - School of Spanish - Nearly 2 million people assisted to the Bicentennial celebration.
Nearly 2 million people assisted to the Bicentennial celebration.